Top floor

This weekend I went to a viewing - not because I'm in the market of a super expensive flat - but because I saw an opportunity. R21 Arkitketer designed three loft conversions in Oslo a few years back, and now one is (was) on the market. The project is nominated for Oslo bys arkitekturpris 2016 and has set a new precedent for the standard of craftsmenship when it comes to the finishing of flats. The architects no doubt spend a lot of time perfecting these flats- and as you would expect the result is perfect. Perhaps developers will see this project and realise that there is a huge market for high quality homes, not just half way solutions that cost next to nothing and last as long. 

The key to the design of these flats are the large windows that not only provide the interiors with tons of light, but add to the quality of space by adding ceiling height to the otherwise relatively low ceilings. It's also rather dramatic- and who doesn't love that?

These arcs are the key to the magic of these flats. They let in light a gives a double night feeling to the otherwise low ceiling space.  

These arcs are the key to the magic of these flats. They let in light a gives a double night feeling to the otherwise low ceiling space.  

The arcs are lined with timber on the inside which adds warmth and caracther to the interiors.  

These arcs are the key to the magic of these flats. They let in light a gives a double night feeling to the otherwise low ceiling space.  

These arcs are the key to the magic of these flats. They let in light a gives a double night feeling to the otherwise low ceiling space.  

Section illustrating how much height the architects added by lifting the ceiling with these arcs.  

Section illustrating how much height the architects added by lifting the ceiling with these arcs.  

This project made me think of other loft conversions I've been lusting after. 

Loft conversion in Vienna

Loft conversion in Vienna

Bernd Gruber oversaw the loft conversion of this Wilhelminian era house in Vienna into a classically modern space. The angled walls and black and white color scheme make for a dramatic, yet minimalist interior.

image.jpg

Loft in Manhattan is a minimalist residence located in New York, New York, designed by Dieter Vander Velpen. The space utilizes premium and elegant materials to enhance the space, and maximize the high ceilings. To contrast the pure feel of the marble, the walls are covered in Mortex, a cement-chalk wall coating for a warm, textured vibe. The table is designed by Dieter Vander Velpen as well, with custom made brass trestles and a walnut tabletop, accompanied by a long bench under the windows that doubles as storage space.

 

The Wooster apartment

The Wooster apartment

The "Wooster apartment" is a dream pad, it has an impressive 7,200sf and occupies the entire top floor of a landmark red-limestone building at the corner of Wooster and Broome Streets, New York City. The loft was renovated by Natalya Kashper of "Dub Studios", she is also the lucky owner.

Instituto Superior de Arte

Born out of the utopian political aspirations of the Cuban Revolution, the dramatic brick and terracotta National Art Schools capture a fleeting moment in the history of Latin American modernism. Founded in 1961, after a round of golf between Fidel Castro and Che Guevara on the course that would become the future site of the schools, the National Art Schools were designed to bring cultural literacy to Cuba in the heady days following the revolution. Castro chose Cuban modernist architect Ricardo Porro, along with Italians Roberto Gottardi and Vittorio Garatti, to design the schools, which were dedicated to modern dance, the plastic arts, the dramatic arts, music, and ballet. It was envisaged that students from other nations would be drawn to the schools by the ideal of learning in an environment that was meant to foster creativity in service to social improvement.

By 1965, Soviet-influenced members of Cuba’s Ministry of Building Works began to favor standardized, functionalist forms over the experimental and unconventional character of these buildings, leading to the eventual abandonment of the project. Of the five schools designed by the trio of architects, only two were completed. The buildings, largely abandoned, stood in near-ruin for years.

Following the inclusion of the site on the 2000 World Monuments Watch, renewed interest facilitated the designation of the National Art Schools as a Protected Area by Cuba’s National Council of Cultural Heritage. This was the prelude to the site’s inscription as a National Monument in 2011. From 2007 to 2009, the School of Plastic Arts and the School of Dance were restored and rehabilitated by the Cuban Ministry of Culture, in an effort led by the original team of architects. The three uncompleted buildings, which suffer the most serious threat of damage from the elements, were also cleaned and stabilized. The school’s inclusion on the 2016 World Monuments Watch aims to build on its new-found international prominence and highlight the need for a comprehensive and integrated approach to the management of the site. (For more see World Monuments Found website)

CUBA_national school of the arts.jpg

School of Music

School of Music

School of Ballet

School of Ballet

School of Ballet

School of Plastic Arts

School of Plastic Arts

School of Dance

Stairs

Just some stairs I love - enjoy!

Antwerp home of Belgian architect Vincent Van Duysen. Gaston, one of Van Duysen’s two dachshunds, stands before the 1940s staircase.

Antwerp home of Belgian architect Vincent Van Duysen. Gaston, one of Van Duysen’s two dachshunds, stands before the 1940s staircase.

Antwerp home of Belgian architect Vincent Van Duysen. Gaston, one of Van Duysen’s two dachshunds, stands before the 1940s staircase.

Antwerp home of Belgian architect Vincent Van Duysen. Gaston, one of Van Duysen’s two dachshunds, stands before the 1940s staircase.

MUSEO ARQUEOLÓGICO DE OVIEDO by Fernando Pardo Calvo Bernardo Garcia Tapia

MUSEO ARQUEOLÓGICO DE OVIEDO by Fernando Pardo Calvo Bernardo Garcia Tapia

Travertine stair Jamie Fobert Architects

Travertine stair Jamie Fobert Architects

Idunsgate Apartment by Haptic Architects

Idunsgate Apartment by Haptic Architects

Inger Sitter

This obsession isn't new, but it's new-found. After the death of Inger Sitter a fresh focus has turned to the talented Norwegian artist. Her art is full of contrasts, which is what I love so much about it. It's feminine, yet masculine. It's dark, yet wonderfully light and colourful. It's also poetic and deep, while remaining aesthetically pleasing. 

 

My new favorites are her stone plates, which are paintings turned into plates of stone, sort of mosaics, with various types of beautiful stone. Never seen anything like it before, which is why I don't know a better word for it then 'stone plate', doesn't seem to cover it, but it'll have to do (unless someone can help me out?). It displays yet another contrast in her art; hard and soft. The soft curves, made up of such a hard material is fascinating and gorgeous. Has to be seen in real life, which you can now at Galleri Brandstrup in Oslo (Tjuvholmen). 

 

PS: My iPhone pictures does NOT do these justice, go have a look your self, or visit the gallery websites for better photographs. Although sadly, they don't have the one I thought was the most impressive!

 

The gallery has on some of her classic large abstract paintings 

The gallery has on some of her classic large abstract paintings 

One of the three 'stone plates' displayed in the gallery

This one is the first one you see when you enter the gallery, and with good reason. Truly spectacular!

Detail showing how the stones are used to create the work of art


Post architecture

I have found the soloution to boredome and the fair of the white paper after a masters course in architecture - draw anything not building related! I've never been good at sketching and it's always been something I've wanted to get better at. So as I'm sat working in a reception waiting for my dream job to come by (!!), I'm practicing sketching (not buildings). 2 mins max per sketch and no inhabitions - I kind of like how ugly they are. 

 

PS:  I'm currently drawing of other things I see online. Check out my pintrest board for fashion illustrations to see what I'm basing these on. One day I'll be as bad ass as these guys!

image.jpg
image.jpg
image.jpg

TIMBER

Technically still a student and looking for a job...? Fill up the time by going to as many events as possible, it will be more difficult to do this once you get a job. Also; being job-less is super boring! Tomorrows activity: Timber Architecture Conferance in Oslo - can't wait! The programme is packed with lectures by noted Norwegian architects, prices, workshops and mingeling. The main focus of the day is on larger building structures such as offices and housing - the future of architecture.

 

cropped-header-trearkitektur-9.jpg

In honour of this conferance (and because I'm bored); here are some timber buildings I fancy right now. 

Impressive roof structure Alfriston School, Buckinghamshir, by Duggan Morris Architects Click on image to see construction images as it's being constructed.

Impressive roof structure

Alfriston School, Buckinghamshir, by Duggan Morris Architects

Click on image to see construction images as it's being constructed.

Timber, timber and more timber! And some concrete. Split View Mountain Lodge, Buskerud, Norway by Reiulf Ramstad Architects Click on image to see more!

Timber, timber and more timber! And some concrete.

Split View Mountain Lodge, Buskerud, Norway by Reiulf Ramstad Architects

Click on image to see more!

It would be a lie to say I only like this because of the timber- I mean look at that copper roof! Lovely and unexpected combination of materials. Community Centre for Evangelical Reformed Church in Würenlos by Menzi Bürgler Architekten

It would be a lie to say I only like this because of the timber- I mean look at that copper roof! Lovely and unexpected combination of materials.

Community Centre for Evangelical Reformed Church in Würenlos by Menzi Bürgler Architekten

Exhibited

Some quick shots from the Kingston School of Architecture and Landscape degree show exhibition this weekend. Some of my work and some examples of the fantastic work of this years show.

'View from Currais' 

'View from Currais' 

First year

First year

Unit 1 My vault models

Unit 1

My vault models

Studio 3.1 Japanese temple timber model

Studio 3.1 Japanese temple timber model

Privacy and Proximity

Kingston School of Architecture student, Rowena Bond, graduate MArch project; Privacy and Proximity 

Besides the elegant project, not the ace layout.

Plan Types: Fixed centralised services, flexible ‘good rooms’ with double aspect 1.200 

Typical floor plan: 1 and 2 Bed apartments, Services fixed around the core 

Figure Ground Plan: 18 Typical Blocks Joined to Create Street & Courtyard Typology 1.500 

Street elevation: 2 typical blocks joined to create hard street edge

Section Through 2 Bed Apartment and Courtyard, Showing Public & Private Amenity Space 1.100 

Section Through 2 Bed Apartment and Courtyard, Showing Public & Private Amenity Space 1.100 

Dwelling type 1: 2 bed. View to courtyard through living spaces

Dwelling type 2: 1 bed. View to courtyar through private amenity space.

Proposed Common Parts
Stoop detail to raised gorund floor 

Paired maisonette enrances

Proposeed main elevation